Lincolnshire Slowly by Bike

This year our annual North Sea Cycle Route took us from Hull to Norwich, each year inching ever closer to the final destination of Harwich. After a near seven hour train journey to Hull we rode to Hessle and wobbled up onto the Humber Bridge.

Cycling buddy Keith leads the way

Though not before admiring the Anchor Brewery tiling on the Dairycoates Inn.

The Anchor brewery was home to Hull Brewing Co from 1867-1985, before being bought and closed by Mansfield. Before the Humber Bridge opened their beer was supplied to Lincolnshire by barge. The single span bridge opened in 1981, the longest of its type in the world at the time, and signalled the closure of the Hull to New Holland ferry. New Holland may have been a slightly disappointing destination for day trippers.

57 miles later we were scrubbed up for a night out in Lincoln, having paused briefly in Market Rasen. Sadly the shop selling this was closed.

No new Good Beer Guide ticks were required on this trip but a couple of pre-emptives were sought out. The Mail Box is in what was once a grand post office.

It’s large, popular with young people and had beers from a brewery called Beermat. The one we had was called Yes Mate and all their beers include the word ‘mat’ within the title. Our man in the midlands may want to sue for copyright https://twitter.com/britainbeermat?lang=en-gb

We had a below par beer in the nearby Dandy Lion, then a delectable Tiny Rebel Send Milds (3.8%, apparently brewed for CAMRA’s annual Make May a Mild Month campaign) in the Strait and Narrow. The latter formed a necessary base camp before the final assault to Beerheadz, which is at the top of Steep Hill. This is well named as anyone who has walked it will know and might even be England’s steepiest hill.

Beerheadz follows the successful formula used by their pubs in the east midlands, selling a range of cask and keg beers.

We belatedly joined a music quiz and, embarrassingly, scored 100% on the Eurovision Song Contest round. But Team Sausage pipped us to third place. Beer quality was high – it was the last of the night so we had a few to prepare us for a longer ride the next day. You could tell we’d had a few because I finished on the Hedgerow Nettle and Bramble Kettle Sour, apparently brewed by Kirkstall in Leeds. It was deliciously refreshing, not very tart and tasted of blackberries. And I wasn’t stung by the price.

The next day was a 73 mile ride to King’s Lynn, the first sections being along the River Witham then an old railway line into Boston.

It was gorgeous and we hardly saw anyone else. The paths were alive with singing sedge and reed warblers, a cuckoo called, while swallows and martins swooped low above our heads. The minor roads were deserted – Lincolnshire is surely England’s sleepiest county.

All quiet at St Hugh’s Village Hall

And as the sun blazed down on our muscular, bronzed torsos (no? feeble, broken bodies then?), we crossed Sutton Bridge into Norfolk and a night in King’s Lynn.

6 thoughts on “Lincolnshire Slowly by Bike

  1. “each year inching ever closer to the final destination of Harwich”

    I took the ferry to there from the Hook back in ’80.

    “and signalled the closure of the Hull to New Holland ferry. ”

    Hang on, this all sounds vaguely familiar. Didn’t you write about that earlier this year?

    “New Holland may have been a slightly disappointing destination for day trippers.”

    (slow golf clap) – Got it in early I see. ๐Ÿ™‚

    “Sadly the shop selling this was closed.”

    Good lord. Closed for good I hope.

    “and had beers from a brewery called Beermat. ”

    I thought you were joking.

    “and all their beers include the word โ€˜matโ€™ within the title”

    Noticed that on their website.

    “Our man in the midlands may want to sue for copyright ”

    Not a chance, as their name is Beermats with an ‘s’. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    “in the nearby Dandy Lion,”

    From the cutesy name, was it a micropub?

    “and might even be Englandโ€™s steepiest hill.”

    At 14% in some spots I would say so. A bit too steep for autos at that gradient.

    Mind you, I’ve driven where the gradient is 20%. Not for the faint hearted!

    https://www.dangerousroads.org/north-america/canada/5751-telegraph-creek-road.html

    “and, embarrassingly, scored 100% on the Eurovision Song Contest round. ”

    (guffaw!)

    “And I wasnโ€™t stung by the price.”

    That’s the dead give-away for ‘had a few’. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    “while swallows and martins swooped low above our heads.”

    I didn’t know Martin could swoop!

    “And as the sun blazed down on our muscular, bronzed torsos (no? feeble, broken bodies then?),”

    Surely the former, what with all that pedalling in the sunshine. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

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